(S2, E2-3) 4 Common Objections to Christianity

In this two-part episode, Levi Dade interviews Dr. Alex McFarland, president of Alex McFarland Ministries, about 4 of the 10 most common objections to Christianity. These objections were taken from Dr. McFarland’s book, The 10 Most Common Objections to Christianity (click here for details). Dr. McFarland is a Christian apologist, author, evangelist, religion and cultural analyst, and advocate for biblical truth.

The four objections in discussion are the following:

  1. The Bible is not Completely Accurate (Part 1)
  2. A loving God wouldn’t send people to Hell (Part 2)
  3. People are basically good (Part 2)
  4. Christians are all Hypocrites (Part 2)

McFarland explains how the idea that the Bible is not completely accurate arose from a subtle progression of ideas that question God and religion, which started some 200 years ago. These include that God is not the communicator and God is not the creator, so God is not the foundation of moral truth.

Out of Germany comes Higher Criticism, that to understand the Bible we don’t look at the words for what they see. We assume it was from Jewish culture. We derive naturalistic explanations rather than see the Bible for what it really is.

Alex McFarland

You can listen to the episode below or click THIS LINK to listen to it on the Defending Christianity Podcast.

https://www.buzzsprout.com/1128407/8681443-4-most-common-objections-to-christianity-part-1.js?container_id=buzzsprout-player-8681443&player=small

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: